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Poster: Thai Stick Date: Jan 19, 2009 12:06pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: GD Incunabula: '12-05-66'

The only thing im missing from this experence is a Lava Lamp, Shaggy Carpet , Mexican Sativa and a cheap 60s porn Flick with long haired unshorn ladies

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Poster: Dhamma1 Date: Jan 19, 2009 12:28pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: GD Incunabula: '12-05-66'

Although I remember those things from the late 60s and early 70s, I have much more vivid memories of tear gas, police dogs, construction workers spraying us with hoses, and soldiers with bayonets lined up outside my college dorm. It wasn't goofy and groovy; that's just how it was portrayed in Austin Powers movies 30 years later.

If you had long hair and went into downtown Chicago in August 68 to buy Anthem of the Sun, chances were very good you'd get beaten up badly by the police. Two days after the Harpur College show, young people were gunned down in the streets of Kent, Ohio.

There was a lot of fear (and courage) alongside the lava lamps, paisley ties, and bell-bottoms.

When people ask why the sixties didn't produce more change, I remind them that the strongest government on the planet -- from the White House and the FBI down to local narcotics and immigration officials -- was determined to squash the "youth rebellion." In the Dead's little corner of the world, Owsley, Kesey and Leary were all sent away for years for possessing a couple joints. Others had it much worse.

So before yielding to the temptation to satirize that era, take a minute to imagine yourself sitting 10 feet in front of a snarling German shepherd beign held back only by a gun-toting policeman who considers you traitorous scum. The Dead and the people who loved them back then were an tiny, tiny, minority, and most Americans would have been delighted to see them all vanish forever. I can't even think of anything analogous today, since America has become so much more tolerant of diversity -- which is one of the legacies of the sixties.

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Poster: Thai Stick Date: Jan 19, 2009 1:13pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: GD Incunabula: '12-05-66'

Pay no attenion to me man, thats a little before my time.
Just a little. Sounds like turbulent times. The Country went through alot of change in that time peroid.

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Poster: fireeagle Date: Jan 19, 2009 3:27pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: GD Incunabula: '12-05-66'

stellar summary of the 60s in the usa, dhamma1. great time-machine ride. thx

the positive (and the negative) effects of the 60s r now clearly visible and felt everywhere, all around the globe

2 bad the forces of evil still prevail

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Poster: deyzof49 Date: Jan 20, 2009 6:10am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: GD Incunabula: '12-05-66'

Dhamma1,
Nice post. I was listening to the Wavy Gravy chatter from Stanford 1973-02-09 and thinkin how things don"t change much. Don't suppose the baskets are passed around at concerts anymore. Lennon did say Dream Is Over. "Everbody's smoking, noones getting high."